Weekly Serial Poetry: Saqil pa Q’equ’mal: Light in Darkness

About this Book

xibalba-cover

The Mayan myths of the Popol Vuh are at once sensual and ruthless, none more so than the trials of Xibalba. In the oral and written traditions of this indigenous people, the road to the ancient underworld is well-marked, its fearsome tests legend. In a series of thirteen poems, a modern woman takes this time-honored journey through good and evil and what lies between, finding strength and refuge, union and reunion, and new purpose in primeval pleasures.

© 2016 Mari Anne Christie


XIII. Paqalik: The Ascent

Akul leads her back
to the silent gate
then runs ahead.

No life, no death
swallows the piercing light.
There are no seekers
ringing the walls. She can see

all the way to the cliffs,
listens for roq’ob’ala’, watches
the bats settle in for daylight
slumber in the trees.

To read the rest of Section XIII, the last section of the poem, as well as Author’s Notes about its creation, go to the blog page.


Weekly Serial Poetry: Saqil pa Q’equ’mal: Light in Darkness

About this Book

xibalba-cover

The Mayan myths of the Popol Vuh are at once sensual and ruthless, none more so than the trials of Xibalba. In the oral and written traditions of this indigenous people, the road to the ancient underworld is well-marked, its fearsome tests legend. In a series of thirteen poems, a modern woman takes this time-honored journey through good and evil and what lies between, finding strength and refuge, union and reunion, and new purpose in primeval pleasures.

© 2016 Mari Anne Christie


XII. Chaim Ja: Blade House

The shards of the door
cut her finger: a kiss
of anticipation.

I am almost afraid.

You? You are afraid of Chaim Ja?

She feels his laughter
in her gut, then nothing.

To read the rest of Section XII, go to the blog page.


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Weekly Serial Poetry: Saqil pa Q’equ’mal: Light in Darkness

About this Book

xibalba-cover

The Mayan myths of the Popol Vuh are at once sensual and ruthless, none more so than the trials of Xibalba. In the oral and written traditions of this indigenous people, the road to the ancient underworld is well-marked, its fearsome tests legend. In a series of thirteen poems, a modern woman takes this time-honored journey through good and evil and what lies between, finding strength and refuge, union and reunion, and new purpose in primeval pleasures.

© 2016 Mari Anne Christie


XI. Sotz’i Ja: Bat House

The house is crumbling;
unseeing eyes in
cracks mark her
progress to the door.

She stops and waits
for armored defense.
These winged mysteries

of sound and speed, of light,
make centipede knees of her skin
falling and shaken

To read the rest of Section XI, go to the blog page.


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Weekly Serial Poetry: Saqil pa Q’equ’mal: Light in Darkness

About this Book

xibalba-cover

The Mayan myths of the Popol Vuh are at once sensual and ruthless, none more so than the trials of Xibalba. In the oral and written traditions of this indigenous people, the road to the ancient underworld is well-marked, its fearsome tests legend. In a series of thirteen poems, a modern woman takes this time-honored journey through good and evil and what lies between, finding strength and refuge, union and reunion, and new purpose in primeval pleasures.

© 2016 Mari Anne Christie


X. B’alami Ja: Jaguar House

There are cats at the gate,
xpe kotz’ b’alam,
xpe tukum b’alam.

stalking their territory.

Keq’ichowik,
fangs twice as wide
as her jugular.

To read the rest of Section X, go to the blog page.


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Weekly Serial Poetry: Saqil pa Q’equ’mal: Light in Darkness

About this Book

xibalba-cover

The Mayan myths of the Popol Vuh are at once sensual and ruthless, none more so than the trials of Xibalba. In the oral and written traditions of this indigenous people, the road to the ancient underworld is well-marked, its fearsome tests legend. In a series of thirteen poems, a modern woman takes this time-honored journey through good and evil and what lies between, finding strength and refuge, union and reunion, and new purpose in primeval pleasures.

© 2016 Mari Anne Christie


IX. Xuxulim Ja: Shivering House

With her unproven weapon,
she scrapes frost from the window,
channeling heat from her hands
through the cold,
green copper of the wall.

The foolish blade freezes,
fear dripping from the point.
She warms it
from her center, slides it back
in the sheath at her hip.

To read the rest of Section IX, go to the blog page.


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Weekly Serial Poetry: Saqil pa Q’equ’mal: Light in Darkness

About this Book

xibalba-cover

The Mayan myths of the Popol Vuh are at once sensual and ruthless, none more so than the trials of Xibalba. In the oral and written traditions of this indigenous people, the road to the ancient underworld is well-marked, its fearsome tests legend. In a series of thirteen poems, a modern woman takes this time-honored journey through good and evil and what lies between, finding strength and refuge, union and reunion, and new purpose in primeval pleasures.

© 2016 Mari Anne Christie


VIII. Q’equ’ma Ja: Darkness House

Another hike, another road.
Another Q’eqa b’e.

Dark soil muddies
her shoes. The anthame
at her ankle drags,

so she leaves it, an altar,
by the side of the road. Angry
burning coals combust
beneath her leather soles.

To read the rest of Section VIII, go to the blog page.


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Weekly Serial Poetry: Saqil pa Q’equ’mal: Light in Darkness

About this Book

xibalba-cover

The Mayan myths of the Popol Vuh are at once sensual and ruthless, none more so than the trials of Xibalba. In the oral and written traditions of this indigenous people, the road to the ancient underworld is well-marked, its fearsome tests legend. In a series of thirteen poems, a modern woman takes this time-honored journey through good and evil and what lies between, finding strength and refuge, union and reunion, and new purpose in primeval pleasures.

© 2016 Mari Anne Christie


VII. Ri Popob’al: The Council Place

Nightbreak the next morning,
she wakes to his hand
through her hair.

He tempers the chill
in the room when he says,
“It is time: kattaqentaj.”

To read the rest of Section VII, go to the blog page.


Weekly Serial Poetry: Saqil pa Q’equ’mal: Light in Darkness

About this Book

xibalba-cover

The Mayan myths of the Popol Vuh are at once sensual and ruthless, none more so than the trials of Xibalba. In the oral and written traditions of this indigenous people, the road to the ancient underworld is well-marked, its fearsome tests legend. In a series of thirteen poems, a modern woman takes this time-honored journey through good and evil and what lies between, finding strength and refuge, union and reunion, and new purpose in primeval pleasures.

© 2016 Mari Anne Christie


VI. Tinimit: The Town

The next-morning sun
slants through the window
as they rush through
the meat pies and fruit
that are breakfast.

Val takes food from
the innkeeper’s daughter
and carries it under his cloak,
handing her a gold coin
and touching her cheek
to see her blush.

To read the rest of Section VI, go to the blog page.


Weekly Serial Poetry: Saqil pa Q’equ’mal: Light in Darkness

About this Book

xibalba-cover

The Mayan myths of the Popol Vuh are at once sensual and ruthless, none more so than the trials of Xibalba. In the oral and written traditions of this indigenous people, the road to the ancient underworld is well-marked, its fearsome tests legend. In a series of thirteen poems, a modern woman takes this time-honored journey through good and evil and what lies between, finding strength and refuge, union and reunion, and new purpose in primeval pleasures.

© 2016 Mari Anne Christie


V. Nim Ja’: The River

The morning is early grey,
sun hidden in this
place of looming.
The mists heat her blood.

Breakfast is brought,
bean stew with squash
and peppers, reheated
from last night’s supper,
still filling and wakeful.

Her bath is made ready
by the innkeeper’s daughter,
whose eyes are dropped and
hands are nearly shaking.

To read the rest of Section V, go to the blog page.


Weekly Serial Fiction: Lord Coventon’s Concubines – Chapter Five

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Chapter Five

A few months later; the day after the final events of La Déesse Noire: The Black Goddess.

The earliest morning sunlight through the window bounced off the satin of Deena’s hair as she gathered it to knot at her nape in a messy bun while waiting for the water from the basin to heat, so she could wash. Coventon ran a gentle hand down her shoulder and placed a kiss behind her good ear. The ties at the throat of his shirt wanted knotting, his cravat was draped across one shoulder, and the top buttons of his falls had not yet been fastened.

To read the rest of Chapter Five, go to the blog page.


About this Book

lord-coventons-concubines-mariana-gabrielle

When Lord Coventon returns to the Masala Rajah Gentleman’s Retreat, his marriage a shambles and dreams of reuniting with Kali Matai naught but ancient fantasy, Madame Mayuri Falodiya has a plan to take his mind off his troubles-Nayana Patel, in need of a protector, but unsure how to entice this taciturn nobleman.

Deena Karan has always had a soft spot for Lord Coventon, for years ago, after a vicious attack cut short her brief career as a tawaif, he helped her recover and establish a successful bakery to earn her living. Still, she vows to help her friend, Nayana, win his attentions, for she knows he could never look past her scarred face.  Could he?

© 2016 Mariana Gabrielle

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